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Poster: Alex.brollo Date: Feb 14, 2014 6:44am
Forum: forums Subject: Asking for critical review of my uploads

I'm going to upload many books kindly shared by Opal Libri Antichi - University of Turin. Please review my test uploads:

* https://archive.org/details/FintoPrincipeAmbrosiOpal
* https://archive.org/details/AmicitiaNardiOpal
* https://archive.org/details/ArtaserseAgostiOpal

I'd like your comments for any mistake and tyour suggestion for any improvement of quality of images and metadata.

Thanks!



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Poster: Jeff Kaplan Date: Feb 14, 2014 2:31pm
Forum: forums Subject: Re: Asking for critical review of my uploads

wow! these are fantastic. close inspection of the scans seems to show compression artifacts. since i'm not sure what your scanner's output options are i'd say that as a general guideline, the best result will come from using the highest possible quality your equipment can produce, with the least post-processing before sending it to us.

and do not worry about the size of the files (except for the time it takes to upload them.) we can handle large files and make jp2000s from your originals.

thanks so much for contributing these. if you upload at least 50 books i can create a collection for your items.

feel free to contact me at info@archive.org.

and, we appreciate that you are adding good metadata. the more the better.

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Poster: Alex.brollo Date: Feb 16, 2014 7:37am
Forum: forums Subject: Re: Asking for critical review of my uploads

Thanks Jeff! I'll write to you some details; here I've only to remark that I discovered Opal Libri Antichi while workung into it.wikisource.org, and some weeks ago I realized that sharing Opal marvellous files into IA will be effective both to let them known to a largest public, and to take advantage of IA derive jobs to improve wikisource work, that's human final check/fixing of OCR and formatting it into a decent html.

I'll update metadata adding needed credit to Claudio Ruggeri, who indefatigably scanned thousand of rare, precious books from Opal.